Elderberry Wine Jelly ~ Recipe from Elderberry Edge Farm

 

Elderberry Wine Jelly Recipe
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Elderberry Wine Jelly

Maybe not for breakfast but it's great with cheese and crackers! If you are considering growing different varieties of elderberries check out my Farm Store, cuttings are available during the first quarter of every year.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 12 1/4 pints
Author Elderberry Edge Farm

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Elderberry Juice reduced to 1/2 cup
  • 2 1/2 cup Elderberry Wine
  • 1 box Pectin
  • 4 cups sugar

Instructions

  1. Fill a caning pot half full with water, and turn to high. Wash jars, lids and screw bands in hot soapy water & rinse with warm water. Place jars and lids, with lids off, in oven on low temperature setting until ready for use.

  2. Slowly heat 1 cup of elderberry juice until it is reduce by about half. This does not have to be precise.

  3. Measure out 4 cups of sugar and set aside.

  4. Take the reduced elderberry juice and add wine until it equals 3 cups. Place in non reactive pan and add pectin.

  5. Over medium heat stirring continuously bring to full rolling boil ~ a boil that does not slow when stirred.

  6. Reduce heat and dump in previously measured sugar, return to full rolling boil and boil for exactly 2 minutes.

  7. Remove jelly from heat, remove jars/lids from oven and fill jars leaving 1/4 inch head space. Place jars in canner on elevated rack. Water must cover jar tops by 1-2 inches. Add boiling water if needed. Bring water to gentle boil. Boil for 5 minutes if you live at 1000 feet. Adjust time as necessary as directed in Altitude Chart if you are not at 1000 feet.

Recipe Notes

I usually use 1/4 pint jars for my elderberry wine jelly. A little goes a long ways and I like to keep my refrigerator uncluttered. To test for jelly thickness I place a small saucer in the freezer before I start making the jelly. Before the jelly goes into the jars I take plate out of freezer and make a line of the jelly across the plate. I then take my finger and run it through the jelly on the plate. If the two sections stay separated the jelly is thick enough.